Give the Forest a Chance!

I am sitting crouched by my desk, with ten different tabs on my computer. My brain is fried by the excessive information that my studies and work require. Oh, did I tell you what I do? I am going to be a nurse, while I also work at a retirement home and finish my master’s degree in English. During some days, my brain is like a store that ordered 2000 liters of milk instead of the 200 liters – laws of nature come against you at some point. Or if I actually manage to fit the 2000 liters of milk into my brain, it surely does not stick, instead the milk leaks out of my ears immediately. And that is the reality for many of today’s employees and students – oversupply of information.

Therefore, I was especially interested in working with the three bald guys of Korpi ForRest. They try to create a balanced mental well-being to work environments by using Finnish forest as a way to generate recovering breaks. As science has proved, forest offers many health benefits (see for example Payne and Delphinus 2019; Lee et al. 2014; Shin et al. 2010). And let’s be honest, many of us, me as well, spend our breaks with our phones, giving our brain an overflow of stimulus all the time. Of course, sometimes, during a break, after having a great moment of being spit on by a patient, I certainly do not feel like trying to find my inner zen in a virtual forest. At that moment, I will open my phone and look at funny memes about my future profession to relieve the stress, but in general, I certainly could switch some of my phone concentrated breaks to a soothing forest environment.

For me forest means serenity. I basically grew up in the middle of a forest, and for example the smell of logs calms my nerves. And I know that now if you, yes you, on the other side of the screen, are a dyed-in-the-wool city dweller, you might see this as a first-class craziness. But give the forest a chance! I learned to appreciate the city buzz, perhaps forest can offer a few tranquil colors to your life. All in all, I am eagerly waiting to see what Korpi ForRest can develop with future technology – visual effects, senses, sounds and smells!

– Pauliina Rinne

References:

Lee, J., Tsunetsugu, Y., Takayama, N., Park, B.L., Li, Q., Song, C., Komatsu, M., Ikei, H., Tyrväinen, L., Kagawa, T. and Miyazaki Y. Influence of Forest Therapy on Cardiovascular Relaxation in Young Adults. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2014. (2014). https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/834360.

Payne, M. and Delphinus, E. The most natural of natural therapies: A review of the health benefits derived from Shinrin-Yoku (Forest Bathing). Advances in Integrative Medicine 6, Supplement 1 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aimed.2019.03.316.

Shin, W.S., Yeoun, P.S., Yoo, R.W. and Shin, C.S. Forest experience and psychological health benefits: the state of the art and future prospect in Korea. Environmental Health Preventive Medicine 15, 38 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12199-009-0114-9.

 

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